The worst Alabama Basketball coaches of all-time

The Alabama Crimson Tide has been fortunate to have some great basketball coaches. It has also had some failures. Let's consider the four worst, going back to 1961.

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Worst Alabama Crimson Tide Basketball Coaches

Coaches are listed in the order of least worst to absolute worst Crimson Tide basketball coach. Coaches before the 1961 season were not considered.

Anthony Grant 2010 - 2015- Winning Percentage 57.9%

Anthony Grant was a good coach at VCU before coming to Tuscaloosa. He has also been a good coach at Dayton after leaving the Crimson Tide. In Tuscaloosa, Grant was not a bad coach, but for whatever reason, he could not put all the pieces together to return Alabama to prominence.

In fairness to Grant, the Alabama program had deteriorated during Mark Gottfried's last two seasons in Tuscaloosa. Under Gottfried, Alabama was 17-16 in 2007-08 and finished 2008-09, 18-14, with Philip Pearson taking over for Gottfried in the last 13 games.

Alabama was 17-15 in Grant's first season. Three good seasons followed, with 25, 21 and 23 wins. Grant's 2011-12 team advanced to the Second Round of the NCAA Tournament. His 2010-11 team was the SEC Regular Season Champion.

Grant's last two seasons in Tuscaloosa saw a serious slippage in the program with a two-season 31-33 record.

Avery Johnson 2016 - 2019 - Winning Percentage 54.7%

It was believed that Avery Johnson's NBA legacy, as a player and as a coach, would restore glory to the Alabama basketball program. There were times during his four seasons when it appeared Avery had Alabama on an upward trajectory. But in three of his four seasons, Alabama had a losing record in SEC play.

Johnson's last Alabama team in 2019, lost six of its last eight games and was blown out by Kentucky in the Tide's second SEC Tournament game. An embarrassing, home game, NIT Tournament loss to Norfolk State ended the Tide's 2019 season at 18-16. The season and its last two games signaled that despite his enthusiasm and hard work, Avery Johnson was not going to succeed in Tuscaloosa.